Countries fomerly part of Mother Russia II

By Bryan • life, photography, tokyo to paris overland, travel • 16 Apr 2009

Any journey through the Baltics (and I’m not talking about the purple Monopoly Property) usually involves more than just a single nation traverse unless visiting one of the tiny three is your life long travel goal.  Once you are in one, you can’t get out without going through another (unless you fly, take a boat or go back to Russia…but then life is no fun).  And if one is really keen, they could toss in good ole’ Estonia make it a complete trilogy adventure.  However, in my case it was merely a sequel involving a brief stint (and by brief, I mean an afternoon) in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Lithuania sounds strangely similar to Lusitania was what I was thinking when the bus crossed the border from Latvia.  I found that thought to be interesting because this border crossing represented the first international border I’ve ever crossed where I was not required to wait in line,  present a passport and visa and hope that everything is ship-shape.  Welcome to the EU…where borders don’t matter and your travelling thoughts are reduced to non-related word simliarities.

Lots of trees in the Baltics.  Canadians from the West Coast like to bask in their large trees under the belief that these coniferous behemouths are somehow unique only to them…unfortunately there are big-ass trees in Lativa and Lithuania too.  Alright, so they are not Cathedral Grove, but their heights would easily give the most experienced Vancouver tree-sitter vertigo.

A Lithuanian fun fact – the country is actually an exporter of oil.

A few hours doesn’t give one much time in a city other than to go to yet another Old Town and sit around the train station drinking beer.

Vilnius, Lithuania

*unrelated to borders, trees, and Lithuania factoids.*

The recent statistics examination saw Team Bryan delt with yet another decapitating blow to the head.  Hence I’ll post travel images, dream of the travel road, and bask in the notion that those concerned with the quantitative never would have made the observation that Lithuania doesn’t have an operational border with Latvia.

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